Jan 212014
 

Penguin here.

Last week we had a warm spell, and it was so nice to go out for walks and enjoy the warmth. This week, we’re back to frigid winter weather (which is the winter norm where we live), and so I thought that it would be very appropriate to post an animal that is also used to cold temperatures: a gentoo penguin chick. By the way, did you know that this penguin was a day old in the picture? You could read more about the chick here at ZooBorns.

Adorable Baby Gentoo Penguin Chick

Adorable Baby Gentoo Penguin Chick

Photo taken by Debbie Grant at Edinburgh Zoo and found here: ZooBorns

Aug 122013
 

Penguin here.

Yesterday was my mother’s birthday, so in her honour, I will be posting a picture of a king penguin mother and her fuzzy chick.

My mother has always been there to watch over me and help me out, just like this penguin who is affectionately embracing her little one.

By the way, Blue Bear and I took many great animal pictures on our trip, so stay tuned, because we will be posting some soon!

King Penguin Mother with Chick

King Penguin Mother with Chick

Found here: National Geographic

Apr 282013
 

Penguin here.

I’m very sorry to be late for something yet again. World Penguin Day is officially April 25th, and we did not make a penguin-related post at that time. I do have a picture of penguins to share, so even though it is a bit late, here’s our post in honour of World Penguin Day, because you know how much we love penguins here at ACAD.

These gentoo penguins are from our local biodome. In early March, they were let out one evening for a few hours, in an area enclosed by blocks of ice. Everyone rushed to see these little guys. Aren’t they so nice? Take a quick note of the penguin on the left whose flippers are in a “bring it on” pose. Also, be sure to notice their goofy feet!

Gentoo Penguins At Our Local Biodome

Gentoo Penguins At Our Local Biodome

Jan 102013
 

Penguin here.

Part of our usual winter woes is catching a cold (just like Blue Bear, my sister, and I did). But catching a cold isn’t all that bad when you have a cute kleenex box like this one to keep you company:

Penguin Pals Kleenex Box

Penguin Pals Kleenex Box

This is my sister’s kleenex box. A special thanks to her for taking a picture of it to share with us!

Now, here’s a picture of a goofy king penguin chick:

King Penguin Chick

Brown Fuzzball (a.k.a King Penguin Chick)

King penguin chick found here: King Penguins

Oct 132012
 

Penguin here.

Today will be our last post about penguins.

Emperor penguins are the largest species of penguin and King penguins rank second. You may be wondering what the differences between King and Emperor penguins are. For one, Emperor penguins are larger; they can weigh anywhere between 22 to 45 kg (49 to 99 lbs) whereas the King Penguin ranges between 11 to 16 kg (24 to 35 lbs), according to Wikipedia’s Emperor Penguin and King penguin articles.

Emperor penguins, which live in Antarctica, are the only species of penguin to breed in the Antarctic winter, travelling to breeding colonies and laying a single egg, which the male proceeds to incubate as the female returns to sea to fetch food. Both parents take turns incubating the egg and fetching food.

An interesting tidbit about King penguins is that they are serially monogamous. In other words, they choose a mate for a whole year, and then usually choose a new mate the following year.

You can read about all this interesting stuff and lots more in the Wikipedia articles mentioned above.

Here is a diagram illustrating some differences between them:

Emperor versus King Penguin

Emperor versus King Penguin

Now here’s a goofy picture of a King penguin surrounded by a bunch of chicks:

Adult King Penguin Surrounded by Chicks

Someone certainly stands out!

Here is a picture of an Emperor penguin with a bunch of chicks:

Emperor Penguin with Chicks

Emperor Penguin with Chicks

Emperor vs King Penguin Diagram Found here: Sparklette
King Penguin with Chicks Found here: TravelWild Expeditions
Emperor Penguin with Chicks Found here: National Geographic

Oct 112012
 

Penguin here.

Today’s post is about the chinstrap penguin.
According to PenguinWorld, chinstrap penguins feed almost exclusively on krill and to a lesser extent on other crustaceans and fish. You can read more about them in that article.

Here is a picture of a chinstrap penguin pair. Isn’t it sweet?

Chinstrap Penguin Pair

Chinstrap Penguin Pair

Here is a picture of a chinstrap penguin with his/her chicks. So cute!

Chinstrap Penguin with Chicks

Chinstrap Penguin with Chicks

Chinstrap Penguin Pair found here: Travel Wild Expeditions
Chinstrap Penguin with Chicks found here: Cool Antarctica

Oct 092012
 

Penguin here.

I love this picture of a Gentoo penguin with his/her chicks. Isn’t it adorable? According to Wikipedia’s Gentoo Penguin article, the Gentoo penguin is the third largest species of penguin, trailing behind the Emperor and King penguins. They also have a characteristic white stripe along their head.

Gentoo Penguin with Chicks

Gentoo Penguin with Chicks

Found here: Baby Gentoo Penguin Chicks in Antarctica

Oct 082012
 

Penguin here.

According to National Geographic Kids Creature Feature on Adelie penguins, Adelie penguins breed and raise their chicks farther south than any other penguin species in Antarctica. Adelie penguins usually lay two eggs at a time, and both parents take care of them.

So now that I’ve share some facts about these birdies, without further ado, here is a picture of an Adelie penguin couple and chick:

Adelie Penguins with Chick

Adelie Penguins with Chick

When I spotted this image, I also felt like I absolutely had to share it with you guys. So, here is a picture of two adorable Adelie penguin chicks:

Adorable Adelie penguin chicks

Two adorable, fuzzy, tiny Adelie penguin chicks


Adelie penguin couple with chick found here: Honisoit: Quality Student Journalism
Adelie penguin chicks found here: Cool Antarctica

Oct 052012
 

Penguin here.

Did you know that the smallest type of penguin is the little penguin, also known as the fairy penguin? According to Wikipedia’s Little Penguin article, these blueish Austrlian/New Zealand coastline natives reach a height between 33 cm-43 cm (13 inches-17 inches).

Little Penguin: Smallest Penguin Species

Little Penguin: Smallest Penguin Species

Found here: True Wildlife